2018 Publications

A ‘Connoisseur’s Panorama’ - Thomas Girtin’s Eidometropolis and Other London Views c.1796-1802 by Greg Smith.  This is the first major study of Thomas Girtin’s great panorama of London since Hubert Pragnall’s groundbreaking publication for the LTS fifty years ago (LTS 109).  Taking advantage of a wealth of recent archival discoveries, the book discusses in depth the production and consumption of Girtin’s contribution to the remarkable cultural phenomenon of the turn of the 18th Century – the 360-degree all-encompassing urban panorama.  LTS 180: Member: £12, Non-Member £16.

The Stone Gallery Panorama - Laurence Wright’s view of the City of London from St Paul’s Cathedral c. 1948-56 by Hubert Pragnell, Patricia Hardy & Elaine Harwood.  This publication provides the reader with panoramic views from the Stone Gallery of St. Paul’s Cathedral made by Lawrence Wright between 1948 and 1956.  His limpid watercolours, predominantly in shades of blue and grey, show the City of London after the devastation of the Second World War, but now with bombed sites cleared and ready to be redeveloped in the optimistic new Elizabethian era.  LTS 181: Member: £12, Non-Member £16.

               To purchase copies - please contact Roger Cline: roger.cline13@gmail.com

What we do

Founded in 1880 the London Topographical Society is a registered charity (No 271590).  It concentrates on publishing books and sheet material illustrating the history, growth and topography of London of all periods. The Society remains true to the vision of its founders by making available maps, plans and views, as well as publishing research, to assist the study and appreciation of London.

Several of the Society’s publications will be of particular interest to genealogists and these include our series of A-Z books which enable researchers to identify streets, courts and alleys, and sometimes even individual houses. This is particularly useful where ancestors’ addresses have subsequently been swept away or re-named. Other key resources are the two parish boundary maps – one covering the City of London (now out of print but available in the Guildhall and other libraries) and another, first published in 1903, for the much fuller extent of the County of London – and Charles Booth's London poverty map of 1889.

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Who we are

Our Society has about 1,200 members worldwide. As well as individuals, membership includes more than 100 universities, libraries and other institutions.  If you are interested in the history and topography of London you're very welcome to join us.

The website includes information about our events and other sources of information (museums, libraries, bookshops, etc) - see links.

The Society's Council meets three times a year, normally in April, September and December.  Council officers can be found at Contact us.

London Events

 ** Walks and Talks

Check out talks and walks about and around London.

** Events at the London Metropolitan Archives

The LMA run a wide selection of talks, guided tours, film screenings, exhibitions and other events. You can find out more about these, as well as the latest updates from the archives, on their website's news and events page.

History of the Society

Two interesting articles are to be found in our publication "The London Topographical Record":

  • Stephen Marks's article "The London Topographical Society: a Brief Account" in the 1980 edition PDF link
  • Simon Morris's symposium paper "The Role of a Topographical Society" in the 1995 edition PDF link

Our website

We hope you find it useful - feedback is always welcome.  Especially as we're in the process of building a new website to replace this one which we hope will go 'live' in September.

Website tower images

We have based our ‘vertical pictorial theme’ on some of London’s towers: each section of this website has its own tower as its symbol.  Can you recognize them?  If you need help with some of them or want to have the overall key to this particular theme click here.

 

Click here for our introduction slideshow